Preparing to Evacuate During an Emergency with Your Cat



Preparing to Evacuate During an Emergency with Your Cat


The recent mandatory evacuations that have taken place in the United States has us thinking about the safety of our loved ones. In addition to making sure that your family and friends are out of harm’s way, it’s important to make preparations that include your beloved pets. If you’re a cat owner, you know just how important it is not to alarm your kitty so they don’t bolt out the door or in an area of the home where you can’t find them.
A calm evacuation requires preparation. By getting things ready in advance, you lessen the likelihood of forgetting something you or your pet desperately needs. As a courtesy to our customers, we’d like to give you some ideas of things to pack for your pet so that they, too, can be comfortable wherever they’re staying.
Here are some tips that help you prepare to evacuate during an emergency with your cat:


• Have enough food and water packed for your pet to get them through at least three full days. This is an absolute necessity. You’ll want to make sure your pet has their own supply of food and water to get them through the difficult time. There will likely be a shortage of these items at stores so stock up long before an evacuation is ordered.
• Keep medication in a waterproof bottle placed in a waterproof plastic bag. If it is raining heavily, you won’t have to worry about losing the meds your cat relies on to remain healthy. Make sure that all bottles are clearly labeled with your pet’s name, the pharmacy where the pills are filled, and the type of medicine with a dosage that your furry friend takes. That way, you’re able to get refills easy because you have this information on hand.


• Make sure that your pet has proper identification. If your cat is microchipped, record the information along with a recent photo of your pet in a Word document. Save it and print a small copy to laminate. Put it in a safe place in your bag or wallet. If you get separated from your cat, you’ll have proof that he or she belongs to you. This is something that many people in Texas and Florida wish they would have done before the hurricane hit.
• A cat carrier is a must-have. The last thing you want to do is wrestle with a scared pet. If you have a cat carrier in your home, practice putting your pet into it. Make it a game for them by leaving the door open and placing their favorite toys inside. Once they’ve become comfortable with the idea of the carrier, you’ll have a much easier time getting them into it if you have to flee quickly.
Leave with your cat while you still have a chance to do so safely. Preparing in advance for natural and man-made disasters buys you extra time to secure your property before leaving it. You won’t be panicked because you’re forced to think and act quickly. Instead, you’ll just grab the things you need and have packed, your cat carrier, and cat, to evacuate before the situation worsens.